Retirement Planning Continues Upon Retirement So be Prepared

Retirement Planning Continues Upon Retirement So be Prepared

As a business owner, you have invested a great deal of time and effort into building your company over the years. You know the amount of planning needed to maintain daily operations and grow your business. Well the same is true for your retirement planning. Now you may be ready for retirement however the planning does not end. What you do next, and how you navigate potential tax issues and regulatory pitfalls, can make a big difference in the long-term success of your retirement planning.

Here are some of the more “taxing” concerns you may face associated with retirement planning:

Early retirement and early withdrawals.

If you take withdrawals from your qualified retirement plan before age 59½, you may be subject to a 10% Federal income tax penalty. There are certain instances in which early withdrawals may be taken without penalty, such as death, disability, or substantially equal periodic payments. Otherwise, at 10%, the penalty tax can be significant, so it is important to plan accordingly.

Waiting too long. You must begin taking required minimum distributions (RMDs) from your traditional Individual Retirement Account (IRA) by April 1 of the year after you reach age 70½. If you fail to do so or do not withdraw enough, you will be subject to a 50% penalty tax, which will be incurred on the difference between your RMD and the actual withdrawal amount. Your RMD amount is based on the previous December 31 balance, divided by your life expectancy (or the joint life expectancy of you and your spouse, if applicable).

Working while receiving Social Security.

If you receive Social Security and also continue to work, a portion of your benefits may be taxable. For more information, refer to Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Publication 915, Social Security and Equivalent Railroad Retirement Benefits, or consult with your tax professional.

You may be subject to the “give-back” if you are under full retirement age (based on the year of your birth), receive Social Security benefits, and earn income. The law requires a give-back of $1 for every $2 earned in excess of $17,040 in 2018 for those individuals between the ages of 62 and full retirement age who are receiving a reduced Social Security benefit.

For the year in which an individual attains full retirement age, the give-back is $1 for every $3 in excess of $45,360 for 2018. Starting in the month in which the individual attains full retirement age, the give-back is eliminated. If you are under full retirement age and thinking about taking Social Security benefits while still working, it is important to understand the potential tax consequences of doing so.

Where you live in retirement matters.

Each state has its own rules on income, estate, sales, and property taxation. Your tax and legal advisors can help you assess the potential tax advantages and disadvantages of your retirement destination.

Retirement Planning Continues through Retirement

Your personal retirement plan probably involved building a nest egg with regular savings over decades. Now that you are preparing for retirement, continue with your planning. Your keen business sense will serve you well as you near retirement and enjoy your “golden years.” Be sure to consult with your professional advisors for specific guidance.

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